Abstract: 

New models of innovation for education are emerging in Europe. Education is by and large a public endeavour, the responsibility of governments and international institutions. We think of education in terms of large and complex systems. Hence, the common assumption has been that change in education will be driven by institutions: governments, universities, consortia of large stakeholders and resource-rich foundations. Recently, we are seeing more and more grassroots entrepreneurship playing a disruptive role in this ecosystem. Admittedly, the entrepreneurial scene is still dominated by American players. Can that change? Does Europe have a voice of its own, which will promote different values and pedagogical approaches? What are the promises and challenges of entrepreneurship in education?  These questions need to be considered in a broader context: according to a recent OECD study, young SMEs account for 42% of new jobs. Europe is acknowledging the importance of fostering a vibrant startup culture, a change of mindset is reflected in initiatives such as startup Europe the startup manifesto and the startup Europe partnership. Universities are responding with entrepreneurship education programmes, and the private sector is responding with a wealth of incubators and accelerators. This trend has been driven by business schools and technology faculties for several years, without a specific domain focus. Recently we are witnessing initial signs of an emerging stream of activity focused on technology enhanced educational innovation. This special issue aims to open up the debate about the promises, risks and challenges of educational entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship education (with a focus on the above), and the synergies between them.  The issue has four in-depth and four from-the-field papers that begin to uncover the landscape of innovation, entrepreneurship and education. The in-depth papers examine the role of serious games for entrepreneurial education; the importance of creating open and new ways for collaboration and innovation for education in small and large learning ecosystems; the identification of key elements of learning design to support innovation in education and the impact of student case competitions and its impact on Entrepreneurship Education and learning.  The from-the-field papers present several projects that bring attention to successful examples of an extracurricular programme for entrepreneurial learning and the significance of grassroots entrepreneurship learning programmes causing positive disruptions for education. In addition to this, a field report on a university’s effort to create an innovative multi-disciplinary media and design studio that reached beyond the walls of the academia, is presented.  We wish to highlight the role that education for entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship for education are playing that can reshape European society. It is important that we take a critical view of the threats they might pose to educational quality, equality, and the challenges faced in terms of resource shortage, institutional culture, and formal qualification schemes.

<p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">New models of innovation for education are emerging in Europe. Education is by and large a public endeavour, the responsibility of governments and international institutions. We think of education in terms of large and complex systems. Hence, the common assumption has been that&nbsp;<strong>change in education</strong>&nbsp;will be driven by institutions: governments, universities, consortia of large stakeholders and resource-rich foundations. Recently, we are seeing more and more&nbsp;<strong>grassroots entrepreneurship</strong>&nbsp;playing a disruptive role in this ecosystem. Admittedly, the entrepreneurial scene is still dominated by American players. Can that change? Does Europe have a voice of its own, which will promote different values and&nbsp;<strong>pedagogical approaches</strong>? What are the promises and challenges of entrepreneurship in education?&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">These questions need to be considered in a broader context: according to a recent&nbsp;<a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oecd.org%2Fsti%2Fyoung-SME-... study</a>, young SMEs account for 42% of new jobs. Europe is acknowledging the importance of fostering a vibrant startup culture, a change of mindset is reflected in initiatives such as&nbsp;<a href="http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/growth-jobs/startup-europe">startup Europe</a>&nbsp;the&nbsp;<a href="http://startupmanifesto.eu/">startup manifesto</a>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a href="http://startupeuropepartnership.eu/">startup Europe partnership</a>. Universities are responding with entrepreneurship education programmes, and the private sector is responding with a wealth of incubators and accelerators. This trend has been driven by business schools and technology faculties for several years, without a specific domain focus. Recently we are witnessing initial signs of an emerging stream of activity focused on&nbsp;<strong>technology enhanced educational innovation</strong>. This special issue aims to open up the debate about the promises, risks and challenges of educational entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship education (with a focus on the above), and the&nbsp;<strong>synergies</strong>&nbsp;between them.&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The issue has four in-depth and four&nbsp;<strong>from-the-field papers</strong>&nbsp;that begin to uncover the landscape of innovation, entrepreneurship and education.<strong>&nbsp;</strong></span><span style="line-height: 1.5;"><strong>The in-depth papers</strong>&nbsp;examine the role of serious games for entrepreneurial education; the importance of creating open and new ways for collaboration and innovation for education in small and large learning ecosystems; the identification of key elements of learning design to support innovation in education and the impact of student case competitions and its impact on Entrepreneurship Education and learning.&nbsp;</span></p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">The&nbsp;<strong>from-the-field papers</strong>&nbsp;present several projects that bring attention to successful examples of an extracurricular programme for entrepreneurial learning and the significance of&nbsp;<strong>grassroots entrepreneurship</strong>&nbsp;learning programmes causing positive disruptions for education. In addition to this, a field report on a university’s effort to create an innovative&nbsp;<strong>multi-disciplinary media and design studio</strong>&nbsp;that reached beyond the walls of the academia, is presented.&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p><p style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">We wish to highlight the role that education for entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship for education are playing that can&nbsp;<strong>reshape European society</strong>. It is important that we take a critical view of the threats they might pose to&nbsp;<strong>educational quality</strong>, equality, and the challenges faced in terms of resource shortage, institutional culture, and formal qualification schemes.</p>


ePaper Articles: 

  • Five Key elements for Educational Innovation using a Learning Design Methodology
  • Building a Business – case study of the entrepreneurship education at the University of Oxford
  • Creating Innovation: Reflecting on the MEDEA Studio at Malmö University
  • Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Education - From the Field: EdTech In The Classroom
  • The Open Education Challenge - a New Model for Effective Educational Innovation
  • An Autoethnographic Perspective of Social Entrepreneurship Focused Student Case-competitions and its impact on Entrepreneurship Education and learning
  • Partnership Model for Entrepreneurial Innovation in Open Online Learning
  • Aspects of a field experience in Entrepreneurship Education
Editorial Number: 
41
eLearning Authors: 
Tapio Koskinen
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