Abstract: 

The proliferation of learning innovations such as personal devices, granular and distributed applications, services, and resources, requires the learner to develop his or her own strategies for managing the various information streams and tools to support learning. Such strategies are necessary not only in educational settings, but basically in any life situation which can become a moment or an episode of learning. Digital and non-digital building blocks can be individually combined by learners in their own personal learning environment (PLEs). 

 

More of an approach or strategy than a specific learning platform, a PLE is created by learners in the process of designing and organising their own learning, as opposed to following pre-arranged learning paths. In this way, PLEs are distinctly learner-centred and foster autonomous learning. PLEs are by no means isolated; they are interconnected in a digital ecosystem of media, tools and services. Instead of asking learners to navigate within one monolithic environment, PLEs act as a gateway to an open and connected learning experience. This approach marks a shift towards a model of learning in which learners draw connections from a pool of digital and non-digital building blocks, aggregating, mixing and combining them into unique constellations as part of learning. 

 
While emphasizing the active role of a learner, the PLE approach implies that learning is not located in a specific time and place, but is an ongoing, ubiquitous and multi-episodic process. As PLEs allow the collocation of diverse learning activities, tools, and resources, contexts permeate and learning becomes connected. In this sense, PLEs challenge some dominant paradigms in education and in the traditional understanding of borders, be it in view of learning places, educational roles or institutional policies. 
 
This special issue builds on the current PLE discussion and focuses on crossing the boundaries of learning contexts. It features some emerging practices, including the construction of PLEs as part of an augmented localised learning experience with mobile devices; PLEs as an approach to supporting learning through work practice; and using gamification and open badges as part of the PLE approach. The findings and insights of the articles in this issue demonstrate the rich contribution of the PLE approach to the opening up of education.

<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-style: normal;">The proliferation of learning innovations such as personal devices, granular and distributed applications, services, and resources, requires the learner to develop his or her own strategies for <strong>managing the various information streams</strong> and tools to support learning.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Such strategies are necessary not only in educational settings, but basically in any life situation which can become a moment or an episode of learning. Digital and non-digital building blocks can be individually combined by learners in their own <strong>personal learning environment</strong> (PLEs).&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 1.5;">More of an approach or strategy than a specific learning platform, a PLE is created by learners in the process of <strong>designing and organising their own learning</strong>, as opposed to following pre-arranged learning paths. In this way, PLEs are distinctly learner-centred and foster <strong>autonomous learning</strong>. PLEs are by no means isolated; they are interconnected in a digital ecosystem of media, tools and services. Instead of asking learners to navigate within one monolithic environment, PLEs act as a gateway to an open and connected learning experience. This approach marks a shift towards a model of learning in which learners draw connections from a pool of digital and non-digital building blocks, aggregating, mixing and combining them into unique constellations as part of learning.&nbsp;</span></p><div style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div><div style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">While emphasizing the active role of a learner, the PLE approach implies that <strong>learning is not located in a specific time and place, but is an ongoing, ubiquitous and multi-episodic process</strong>. As PLEs allow the collocation of diverse learning activities, tools, and resources, contexts permeate and learning becomes connected. In this sense, PLEs challenge some dominant paradigms in education and in the traditional understanding of borders, be it in view of learning places, educational roles or institutional policies.&nbsp;</div><div style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div><div style="font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify;">This special issue builds on the current PLE discussion and focuses on crossing the boundaries of learning contexts. It features some emerging practices, including the construction of PLEs as part of an augmented localised learning experience with mobile devices; PLEs as an approach to supporting learning through work practice; and using gamification and open badges as part of the PLE approach. The findings and insights of the articles in this issue demonstrate the rich contribution of the <strong>PLE approach to the opening up of education</strong>.</div>


ePaper Articles: 

  • Personal Learning Environments in Smart Cities: Current Approaches and Future Scenarios
  • A gamification framework to improve participation in social learning environments
  • Developing a framework for research on Personal Learning Environments
  • Developing PLEs to support work practice based learning
  • Using PLEs in professional learning scenarios – The Festo case for ROLE
  • Investigating teachers’ perception about the educational benefits of Web2.0 personal learning environments
  • Decentralized badges in educational contexts: the integration of Open Badges in SAPO Campus
  • Personal Learning Environments: A conceptual landscape revisited
Editorial Number: 
35
eLearning Authors: 
Tapio Koskinen
Språkhjälp